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At a glance: Speakers for the 2017 - 18 Season

Edgar Wood

18th September: Peter Wadsworth – ‘Strawberry Studios’

16th October: Barrie & Wendy Armstrong - ‘Arts & Crafts of the Area’

20th November: Judith Wilshaw – ‘Marple & Mellor - A Textile Tale’

11th December: Anne Beswick - ‘Manchester ‘Drunk & Sober’’

15th January: Ian Miller - ‘Arkwrights Shudehill Mill’

19th February: Neil Mullineux – ‘A Mayor in Chains’

 

19th March: Sue Bailey – ‘Woodsmoor, The Story’

16th April: David Joy – ‘Liverpool Cowkeepers - A Family History’

18th September: Peter Wadsworth – ‘Strawberry Studios’

Strawberry Studios

Queues formed, money paid, forms filled, music heard, history told, tea taken doors locked, good night.

The evening in a sentence, but what lies behind those words? Yes, it was that September time again, not back to school for those that trooped into the foyer of the church, that was long ago, but a time to pay for membership or a visit, renew or join, cheque or cash.

Over ninety people sat down and faced the front. Are you sitting comfortably? Then the evening can begin. Chairman Ann Hearle welcomed members both old and new and introduced our speaker, Peter Wadsworth.

Read more: 18th September: Peter Wadsworth – ‘Strawberry Studios’ 

Arts & Crafts in the Marple Area

Edgar Woods Arts & CraftMonday, October 16th

Darker evenings beckon as we slide into October. On the 16th, Barrie & Wendy Armstrong will visit the society and present a talk on 'Arts & Crafts in the Marple Area.' The Armstrongs have combed the landscape for buildings displaying or incorporating designs from the Arts & Crafts, and published several books.

The arts and crafts movement was made up of English designers and writers who wanted a return to well-made, handcrafted goods instead of mass-produced, poor quality machine-made items.

A movement of ideals. The Movement took its name from the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society, founded in 1887, but it encompassed a very wide range of like-minded societies, workshops and manufacturers. It advocated the reform of art at every level and across a broad social spectrum, and it turned the home into a work of art. Visually, the style has much in common with its contemporary art nouveau and it played a role in the founding of Bauhaus and modernism.