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Stories of Places

Postcards

 Lych Gates of St Martin's Church A few months ago, Ann Hearle generously donated her collection of local postcards to the Society. Collected over 40 years, there are more than 1000 cards, most of which date from the early 1900s. Some are postmarked but many are not and, similarly, some have messages but others don’t. Postcards were very popular in the early 1900s and Ann’s collection includes examples from more than 13 publishers including Kennerley Photographer from Marple Bridge and Raphael Tuck & Sons, Art Publishers to their majesties The King and Queen (Edward & Alexandra) who were based in the City of London. Postcards were sold through local shops and often included the shop name e.g. T W Waterhouse of the Post Office, Rowarth and M H Moore Stationers, Marple.

Many images are already shared on the Virtual Tour of Marple which Mark Whittaker runs via the Marple website, but many are new to us. The Virtual Tour can also be accessed from the MLHS website. Here are some postcards, which I hope you find interesting. Thanks to our President, Ann Hearle.

(above) A hand-coloured version of a postcard showing the Lych Gates of St Martin's Church on Brabyns Brow.

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If Walls Could Talk

Beechwood HouseIf walls could talk

Many of you will recognise this imposing stone house, Beechwood, which is at the top of Lakes Road leading down to the Roman Lakes.  However, why was such a fine house built so near to Oldknow’s workers cottages at Stone Row and who lived in it? Documents in the Archives and the census returns can answer some of these questions and provide a fascinating insight into the lives of those who lived there over one hundred years ago.

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A peek at Christmas 1951

Christmas 1959 Manchester‘Christmas comes but once a year.’ And the year is 1951. Dusting off the sheet, and gently lifting a corner, what surprises await us as we gaze down through 65 years?
Back to the time when a three-bedroom semi could be bought for £750, on an average wage of just over £10 per week. For this you would work 42 hours, in contrast to the average today of 32 hours. Rationing was still in force in 1951; people could still buy only 10d. (4p) worth of meat each week. Pensioners made up 6pc. of the population, today the figure stands at 14pc. In 1952 the number of people celebrating their 100th birthday was just 300, now the figure is close to 15,000. (left, a little licence taken, Manchester City Centre crowded with Christmas shoppers on a wet Saturday December afternoon. 19th December 1959)

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Old Manor Farm

Marple has five nationally important buildings, listed by English Heritage as either Grade 1 or Grade II* One of these is Old Manor Farm, tucked away above the Marple Brook which runs in the valley near Dan Bank. Described by Pevsner as 'a small medieval manor house, the central part timber-framed, probably 15th century, with a two-bay hall of cruck construction. Later wings were added, the service wing of stone, the other half-timber.' Its importance was recognised in 1951 when it was featured in Cheshire Life as one of the “Homes of Cheshire”.

(left: Old Manor Farm at Dan Bank, 1981)

Read the article from the Cheshire Life

1683 Thomas Massey House

A story that comes courtesy of Marple Historical Society.The Marple in Pennsylvania, which had a population in 2010 of 23,478,and area of 10.5 square miles whilst Marple’s, Cheshire population in 2011 was 23,686 in an area of 11 square miles, almost identical twins ! Marple Township, Delaware County,  originates from 1684, on the 29th September 1863; Quakers had settled the county Delaware after sailing along the River Delaware, in the ship Endeavor.

The following article is taken from the Spring-Summer issue of the Marple Historical Society newsletter, not to be confused with the Marple Local History Society.Special thanks to Rich Paul of Marple Historical Society.

Read more: 1683 Thomas Massey House